This young man erected a military memorial since his hometown lacked one.

Standing in front of the monument he constructed as part of his Eagle Scout project is Dominique Claseman. hide caption Mark Jurgensen
switch to caption Image by Mark Jurgensen Standing in front of the monument he constructed as part of his Eagle Scout project is Dominique Claseman.
Jurgensen, Mark Dominique Claseman, 17, decided to take action after learning that his city of Olivia, Minnesota, lacked a veterans memorial.
Many people of Olivia, a small town that fancies itself the “corn capital of the world,” are veterans or connected to veterans, according to Claseman.
He served alongside his father, grandpa, and great-grandfather. He described his family’s history in the military as “simply never-ending.”
So when the teenager was required to select a purpose for his Eagle Scouts project, he chose to construct Olivia’s own soldiers memorial.

a view of the finished memorial’s statue and etched pavers. hide caption Mark Jurgensen
switch to caption Image by Mark Jurgensen a view of the finished memorial’s statue and etched pavers.

Jurgensen, Mark It made sense to Mark Jurgensen, his father, that his son would have such lofty goals. The Scout leader of his son’s troop is Jurgensen.

I advised Dominique to “go big or go home” because he is the Scoutmaster’s son when he first started talking about his Eagle Scout project, according to Jurgensen.

To gather information and inspiration, Claseman toured the veterans memorials in neighboring towns before developing a simple design.

Claseman stated, “My initial vision was merely a walkway with 21 boot steps and pavers on the side, coupled with a major stone and a few flags.

He began funding the estimated $15,000 needed to complete the project.

the construction of the memorial. hide caption Mark Jurgensen
switch to caption Image by Mark Jurgensen the construction of the memorial.

Jurgensen, Mark According to Claseman, applicants for Eagle Scout projects aren’t permitted to use internet communications, so rather than using online fundraising platforms for charities, he started flyer campaigns and gave speeches at nearby events.

Basically, Claseman said, “it was either word-of-mouth or knocking on doors.”

But they were effective. The amount of money that his community was willing to donate to the soldiers memorial was significantly higher than he had anticipated.

He had precisely raised $77,777 towards the project when the fundraising campaign came to a conclusion.
Claseman altered the plan to match the new spending limit and started construction.

As the monument is constructed, wet cement dries. hide caption Mark Jurgensen
switch to caption Image by Mark Jurgensen As the monument is constructed, wet cement dries.

Jurgensen, Mark On Memorial Day, the public saw the finished memorial for the first time. It has 280 engraved pavers that lead to flagpoles and seating areas and are bordered by planted plants.

He definitely got large by the time everything was said and done, joked Jurgensen.
Throughout the event, his neighbors expressed their gratitude to him for all that he had done for the community.

the event where the memorial was made public. hide caption Mark Jurgensen
switch to caption Image by Mark Jurgensen the event where the memorial was made public.

Jurgensen, Mark One individual approached me and expressed their joy at seeing this, according to Claseman. They have been residing in this town for 10 to 15 years, and they have been waiting for something similar to occur.

The 21 boot prints in the concrete that depict the 21-gun salute and lead to the flag poles are Claseman’s favorite feature of the memorial. His father made the prints and put on the combat boots he wore while serving to assist his son.

Standing in front of the memorial are combat boots. hidden caption Mark Yurgensen
switch to caption Combat boots by Mark Yurgensen

are displayed in front of the monument.

Yurgensen, Mark Being able to take part in it, Jurgensen remarked, “was nice.” Being a veteran myself, I want to ensure that other veterans and their families have a location to visit in order to honor their sacrifice or mourn their loved ones.

In terms of what comes next, Claseman claimed that he has already discussed plans with his siblings for their next Eagle Scout projects.

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