How two astronomers collaborated to take a stunning photo of the moon

The final image was edited by astrophotographers Andrew McCarthy and Connor Matherne over the course of more than nine months. It is a composite image made from more than 200,000 individual photos. Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy cover caption

switch to caption Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy

The final image was edited by astrophotographers Andrew McCarthy and Connor Matherne over the course of more than nine months. It is a composite image made from more than 200,000 individual photos.

Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy In order to make one incredible image of the moon, two astrophotographers collaborated to collect over 200,000 images.

Last November, Andrew McCarthy and Connor Matherne worked together to push the boundaries of photography. Their completed work was published online on Saturday and is currently receiving a lot of interest on Reddit .

The two astronomers have been sharing and commenting on one other’s work for the past three or four years after initially connecting on Reddit and then Instagram. They chose to work together for a moon photo session after realizing each other’s photographic strengths.

He and I were able to create something that was slightly off brand for both of us when we put our minds to it, which is cool, McCarthy said NPR. “Every tile is made up of thousands of images, and the whole thing is put together like a mosaic.”

Tens of thousands of shots were taken to record the geographical features on the moon’s surface, according to McCarthy, a specialist in detailed photography. Matherne is an expert in colors and likes to take pictures of deep space.

In the course of a single evening, McCarthy took approximately 200,000 precise pictures of the moon from Arizona, while Matherne took an additional 500 pictures to record color information. In order to generate a detailed image of the moon in stunning color, they merged their efforts by stacking the photos on top of one another.

Matherne noted, “Andrew aimed solely for the detail side whilst I aimed solely for the color side.” That gave us access to the full moon.

Both Andrew McCarthy and Connor Matherne concentrated on various facets of the shot in order to fully capture the color and details of the moon’s surface. McCarthy took nearly 200,000 photos of the moon’s intricacies, and Matherne took an additional 500 to record the moon’s vivid colors. Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy cover caption

switch to caption Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy

Both Andrew McCarthy and Connor Matherne concentrated on various facets of the shot in order to fully capture the color and details of the moon’s surface. McCarthy took nearly 200,000 photos of the moon’s intricacies, and Matherne took an additional 500 to record the moon’s vivid colors.

Connor Matherne and Andrew McCarthy They used picture editing software throughout the course of the following nine months to share ideas and revisions with one another and create the greatest image they could.

Despite the technical nature of their work, Matherne and McCarthy claim that other photo fans can still access it. A camera, tripod, and a star tracker are all that are needed. By investing in a telescope, aspiring astrophotographers can advance their work, but the two advised learning the fundamentals of photography first.

But astrophotography is more complex than a point-and-shoot endeavor. McCarthy noted that exercising patience is one of the most challenging aspects of the job.

The absence of light pollution and clean skies are essential for a good photography. McCarthy always leaves empty-handed, so his successes are much the more significant.

If you can’t manage it, you won’t be able to take photos as good as these, he claimed. Everyone can do it, but it requires a particular temperament.

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